Sourdough 50% plain flour 50% Canadian flour

For this recipe be sure to use a good strong Canadian flour, not all of them are the same.  The Waitrose’s Canadian is good but the Sainsbury’s Canadian is not, certainly not from my past experience.  If buying Canadian flour direct from a mill I would expect it to be a good one, but I would advise to ask the mill to e-mail you the flour specifications to check it doesn’t have amylase added, as sourdough and amylase are not a good mix, creates a damp crumb.  The benefit of buying direct from a mill is that you can ask for the flour specification, something not optional buying bread flour from supermarkets.

The plain flour was standard supermarket and its protein sits around 10%.  Loaves can be made with 100% plain flour.  I know of a bakery in London using 9% protein flour for their baguettes but for that I would use a slightly different formula, certainly the use of the fridge.

The benefit of using the low protein plain flour is to give an open crumb without using very high hydration in the recipe, and the strong Canadian is there as a security blanket making certain the loaf retains its shape, rises well and still has oven spring.

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What’s noticeable about this dough is the easily tearing of the plain flour.

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And that continues right through the last fold.

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Once shaped and left to rise the Canadian does keep it all together.

50-50 plain flour and Canadian

The insurance of the Canadian is to produce a good oven spring.

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For comprehensive details on how to fold and bake using steam read;  Walnut Bread recipe

 

Sourdough 50% plain flour 50% Canadian flour
 
Ingredients
  • 200g ripe levain (using wheat white bread flour)
  • 250g strong Canadian flour
  • 250g plain flour
  • 10g salt
  • 320g water
Instructions
  1. Fold the dough 3 times, resting after each time. In the summer months when temperatures are 22˚C plus the folding can be done within 1 hour. When temperatures hit below 19˚C the folding can be done within 2hrs as the dough is slow.
  2. Shape.
  3. For final rise let it rise until increased in size considerably, depending on weather/room temperature can take 2.5hrs in very warm weather to 8hrs in winter.
  4. Bake using steam in well pre-heated fan oven 200˚C for 50mins. Baking times will vary depending on the oven.